FAQ


What must be done on the most difficult day of one's life?

Why do we have funerals?

What is the purpose of embalming?

Is embalming required?

What is cremation?

What is Memorialization?

Who pays for funerals for the indigent?

What about Social Security benefits?

What about Veterans benefits?

Do I need a will?


What must be done on the most difficult day of one's life?
    Notify these people:
  • Doctor or Coroner
  • Funeral Director
  • Cemetery or Memorial Park
  • Relatives and Friends
  • Minister and Church
  • Employers
  • Organist and Singer
  • Pallbearers
  • Insurance Agents
  • Unions and Fraternal Organizations
  • Newspapers
  • Executor of Estate
    Select these items:
  • Cemetery Property
  • Casket
  • Vault
  • Clothing
  • Flowers
  • Music
  • Food
  • Furniture
  • Time
  • Place
  • Transportation
  • Cards of Thanks
    In additional to:
  • Providing vital statistics about the deceased
  • Preparing and signing necessary papers
  • Providing addresses for all friends who must be notified
  • Answering innumerable sympathetic phone calls, messages and letters
  • Meeting and talking with everyone about all details
  • Greeting friends and relatives who call
  • Providing lodging for out-of-town guests
  • Cleaning home
  • Planning funeral car list
    Items that must be paid in whole or in part:
  • Doctor
  • Nurse
  • Hospital
  • Medicine and Drugs
  • Funeral Director
  • Cemetery
  • Grave Service
  • Minister
  • Organist
  • Florist
  • Clothing
  • Transportation
  • Telephone and Telegraph
  • Food
  • Memorials

Why do we have funerals?

Funerals are for the living — they allow us to honor and remember a life that has been lived. Helping you personalize your service begins with understanding your wishes. Our goal is to provide a service that is uniquely yours — one that focuses on a life that has touched many people. By concentrating on the positive aspects of a person's life, we have found that our services are much more meaningful and sincerely appreciated.

Learn more about our Funeral Services


What is the purpose of embalming?

Embalming sanitizes and preserves the body, retards the decomposition process, and enhances the appearance of a body.


Is embalming required?

No, although embalming may be required if death was caused by a contagious disease, when the body is transported to another state, or if final disposition is delayed.


What is cremation?

Cremation is the process of reducing the body to bone fragments through the application of intense heat. This usually takes from two to three hours and occurs in a special type of furnace, known as a cremation chamber or retort. The remaining fragments are then processed into a finer substance and placed in a temporary container. Before the remains are returned to the family, they are usually transferred to an urn for permanent containment.

Learn more about our cremation services


What is Memorialization?

Memorialization is simply a way to be remembered. Man has always sought to perpetuate his memory — to evidence a life rich in accomplishment and enjoyment. Religious teachings place a reverence on the human body which does not end in death. This belief is fostered in our cemeteries, national monuments and in our heritage.

Individual memorialization takes many forms and is based on ones own beliefs, as well as financial conditions. Alternative methods of burial usually determine the type of memorial a family will select. Many cemeteries offer the following options:

In-Ground Burial Flush marker (bronze or granite) or Upright Monument
Mausoleum Bronze or inscribed crypt lettering
Cremation Mausoleum Niches (Glass Front or Granite Front) or In-Ground Burial
Scattering Some cemeteries provide areas for the scattering of cremated remains. Memorial plaques are often located within these scattering gardens for the names of the deceased.

Scattering in the air or over water is legal in many areas, but survivors' feelings should be carefully considered. Many survivors need a specific location or just "a place to go" for reflection and this emotional need may be overlooked if scattering takes place too quickly.
Art Features Mausoleum and cemeteries often incorporate various types of artwork in their design which are made available for donation by individuals; examples include stained glass windows, pictures and sculptures. Personal donations of family heirlotableoms, paintings or even personal works of art all serve to provide a special memorial that can be admired and appreciated by all.
Living Memorials This simple act of planting a tree can be a most fitting way to remember a loved one. Many cemeteries and parks welcome these gifts when consulted.

Who pays for funerals for the indigent?

Veteran, union, and other organizational benefits are available to help indigent families pay for the funeral of a loved one. In addition, some form of public aid is available in most states from either the state, the county, the city, or a combination.


What about Social Security benefits?

A surviving spouse often has claim to both monthly support payments as well as certain death benefits. In addition, benefits may be permitted for children under 18 years of age. These benefits are NOT AUTOMATIC and must be claimed by contacting your nearest office listed in the telephone book under "United States Government - Health, Education and Welfare Department - Social Security Administration." When making a claim, be sure to request a list of the documents you will be required to produce in order to avoid time delays.

An annual check with the Social Security Administration is recommended to insure that the proper amounts from your paychecks are being credited to your account. To obtain your Statement of Earnings record, simply drop them a postcard stating the nature of your request, name, address, Social Security number, date of birth, and signature.


What about Veterans benefits?

While Veterans benefits and allowances change periodically, it is important that you are aware of the benefits you are entitled to and the proper procedure for claiming them.

We suggest you contact your local Veterans Administration Office listed in the telephone book under "United State Government, Veterans Administration" at time of death. These benefits are NOT AUTOMATICALLY PAID and must be claimed following proper procedures to receive the available benefits at the time.


Do I need a will?

Do you have one? Your financial "worth" has little to do with your need for this important document. A Will provides for an orderly transition of property — even those items of a personal nature that may have only "sentimental value" can usually be passed on the basis of your wishes.

If you don't have a Will and die, most states have laws governing who and how your assets will be handled. This includes financial matters as well as assignment of guardians for your children.

Your Will should be reviewed every few years to take advantage of any changes which may occur in the tax law. Upon your death, your Will must be probated and your estate administered. Wills are very important and while they necessarily do not have to be difficult, we recommend that you seek professional assistance in this area.


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